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How To Migrate Windows 7 to a Solid State Drive

How To Migrate Windows 7 to a Solid State Drive

Installing a solid-state drive is one of the best upgrades you can make to your computer, but migrating your Windows installation to a small drive can be tricky, because your data won't necessarily all fit on the drive. Here's how to install an SSD without reinstalling Windows from scratch.

20 of the Best Windows 7 Articles of 2011

Ready to upgrade to a new Solid State Drive (SSD)? Paragon’s Migrate OS to SSD is just what you need. Our handy intuitive wizard performs fast and safe Windows migrations to new storage devices (HDD or SSD) and even downsizes to smaller capacity drives, thanks to advanced new data exclusion capabilities. You can transfer a live system with no impact to your work, and have your partitions automatically aligned in the process if needed. New Microsoft Windows 10 support!


Firstly, you need to back up your current drive, and then delete all your personal files if necessary so that your Windows installation can fit on the solid-state drive. After this, you’ll clone your current drive onto the SSD and erase your current drive as required. This operation allows you to move all your folders back to the original hard drive and restore all your personal files from the back up. This is just a brief procedure of migrating Windows from HDD to SSD, but the whole process is genuinely complicated.

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Installing a solid-state disk is one of the best upgrades which we are quite familiar; however, migrating your Windows installation to a small disk must be more complicated, because the data won't necessarily all fit on the new disk. Here's how to migrate to a SSD disk without reinstalling Windows.

How-To Geek - For Geeks, By Geeks.

For one final test to see everything went as planned, let’s make sure Windows recognizes your drive as an SSD. Hit Win+S to search for “defrag” and select “Defragment and optimize your drives.” In the Optimize Drives window, your drive should be listed as a Solid State Drive. (Windows 7 has slightly different instructions. Hit the Windows key to bring up the search, look for “defrag,” and choose “Disk Defragmenter.” Click on the “Configure Schedule” button and then “Select disks” to see your disk drives listed. Your drive should be listed as an SSD.) Mission complete!

Note! - Migrate OS to SSD only transfers partitions that contain the chosen Windows OS and system boot critical files. If you need to migrate your entire system, including all system and data partitions, please use Paragon Drive Copy. - Dynamic discs are not supported.

There’s no better way to speed up and upgrade a laptop than to replace its mechanical drive with an SSD (Solid State Drive). It’s a no-brainer, but if the thought of reinstalling Windows 8.1 and all of your programs and then tweaking all of their settings gives you the chills, don’t worry. In an hour or two, you can easily be up and running with a clone of your current system — except now your laptop will have blazing performance. Here’s how to do it.

Excellent methodology to migrating a Windows 7 installation to an SSD from another hard drive, however I’ve also run into the same issue as the prior respondent. I have my Win7 installation on a drive with about 175Gb and trying to migrate it to a 240 Gb SSD. I’ve run defraggler several times after unprotecting the drive and disabling the hibernation mode and my drive remains stuck at 7% fragmentation, which is preventing me from shrinking the partition down to the size necessary to fit within the SSD. It seems a few choice system files are unmoveable by defraggler. Couldn’t find any follow up thread regarding using Parted Magic to move those unmoveable files to shrink the drive. Was hoping you could elaborate on the process.

At launch, the wizard detects all existing Windows operating systems. Users then specify which OS they want to migrate. The wizard then automatically picks one or two partitions (Windows 7 may have Microsoft System Reserved, a special hidden partition that contains critical boot files) and prompts the user to select a destination disk. If the selected disk is big enough to hold the operating system, it starts the migration. If not, it asks the user to exclude data by unchecking boxes next to unnecessary files or folders. When the proper size is reached, the migration begins. The intuitive wizard transfers a Windows system to another disk with minimal effort. The only action needed by the user after the migration is to configure the destination disk as the first boot device in BIOS which automatically starts the new system. To learn more, watch our online video. Note! - Migrate OS to SSD only transfers partitions that contain the chosen Windows OS and system boot critical files. If you need to migrate your entire system, including all system and data partitions, please use Paragon Drive Copy. - Dynamic discs are not supported.

I would advise against cloning to an SSD because as you said, it's not at all optimized. Windows will most likely treat it like a platter drive. If you clone to the SSD you risk not only losing performance, but causing damage that can only be repaired by securely erasing the drive. Just install Windows to the drive as normal m 0 l

I would advise against cloning to an SSD because as you said, it's not at all optimized. Windows will most likely treat it like a platter drive. If you clone to the SSD you risk not only losing performance, but causing damage that can only be repaired by securely erasing the drive. Just install Windows to the drive as normal

Wow. This article makes things way harder than they need be. I’m not sure if the folks at The Geek are aware of this, but Windows 7 is fully SSD aware. Fully. That means that awareness extends to the Windows 7 backup and restore utility and its built in disk image function. You can try and verify for yourself, but I promise that this is a true thing. What this means is that if you are migrating an existing Windows 7 installation from a standard hard disk to an SSD, you do NOT need Clonezilla or EaseUS Partition Manager, and you do NOT need to use diskpart to align the partitions. Really. After reading this article I was filled with doubt about what I thought I knew, so I set about verifying that what I thought I knew was right. And here’s what I thought I knew (and have verified to be so.) A Windows 7 system image generated by the Windows 7 backup and restore utility from a Windows 7 installation on a standard hard disk is properly aligned automatically when that image is used to migrate/restore the Windows 7 OS to a solid state disc. How did I verify this? Well, I checked the Dell Latitude E6500 that sits on my desk which was set up in exactly this way. Partitions are aligned properly. Then I called a friend for whom I had just a few weeks ago migrated an existing Windows 7 installation from a Western Digital Scorpio Black 320 gig drive to a Samsung 470 SSD just a few weeks ago and had him check the partition offset. It was perfect. (1048576.) And then I checked half a dozen assorted other laptops and desktops I had migrated from spinning hard disks to SSDs using Win 7’s own backup and restore generated system image and in each and every case the SSD was aligned properly. If you have Win 7, you don’t need Clonezilla or EaseUS or Acronis or Ghost. All you need is Win 7. Boot with the Wi n 7 OS DVD or a recovery disc and restore the system image to the new drive. That’s it. Check for yourself. The advice on things like defrag? Good advice, but you don’t need Defraggler or any third party software for that either. Win 7’s defrag consolidates free space. You can verify this by running Win 7’s defrag from as an admin from the command prompt. (CMD–>run as administrator) Run defrag /c /u /v Yes, clear all the temp files. Disable hibernation. Reduce the swap file (but don’t turn it off completely.) Run Win 7’s defrag from the command prompt. Shrink the partition (if needed to make it fit on the new SSD.) Generate a system image on an external USB or eSATA (if your system supports booting with eSATA) drive. Install your SSD and restore the system image. That’s it.
How To Migrate Windows 7 to a Solid State Drive dalelak info on 7:25 م 5

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